Powered by Max Banner Ads 
Sign Up For Our Weekly Roundup Email and Get a FREE Copy of Our "501 Tips, Strategies & Professional Secrets for Home Business Entrepreneurs" eBook
September 2008
M T W T F S S
« Aug   Oct »
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930  

Lined Drawstring Bag

From time to time we all need just a simple drawstring bag to carry our “stuff” — shoes, extra things to take to work or school, and even for the children to carry their “important things” in.  Try this drawstring bag and I’m thinking you’ll be needing more sizes than just this one, so you’ll be making quite a few of them.  This tutorial comes from HappyThings Blog.  There are other variations of the lined drawstring bags including making lined backpacks from the same blog.  Check them all out!


DSB 201: Lined Drawstring Bag




Dsb2_0_complete_1 


Here’s the next variation.  It is still very simple and is constructed basically the same way as the 101 version, but it has a lining fabric.  I will go through each step in detail again.  I don’t know about you, but I don’t learn everything on the first try.


By the way, click each photo for a slightly larger view if you need it.


Dsb2_1_sew_ends_together


1.  Start with 2 pieces of fabric cut the same size — determined by the size you want your bag.  Remember, you’ll lose about an inch and a quarter x2 on the ends (at least) and a 1/4 inch x 2 on the sides.  Lay the fabrics right sides together and pin the two shorter sides.
2.  Using a 1/4 inch seam, sew the two shorter sides together.


Dsb2_2_flip_and_press


3.  Flip the fabrics right side out, and press the seam flat as seen above.


Dsb2_3_casing


4.  Now, sew a line of stitches about one inch down from the top (or first seam) to create your casing.  Do this on both ends.  Remember to secure your stitches at the beinning and end.  Note:  If you are going to make a backpack, you’ll want to use thicker cording — so make the size of this casing large enough to accomodate two pieces of your cord with ease.


Dsb2_4_stitch_up_sides


5.  Fold your bag in half with the lining fabric on the outside.  Pin up the sides, stopping where your casing begins.  Sew up the sides using a 1/4 inch seam, stopping right where your casing begins.
** If you are doing the backpack variation, before you do step 5 see note at end of tutorial.
6.  Turn the bag right side out and press the seams flat.


Dsb2_5_cut_cord


7.  Cut 2 pieces of cord to desired length.  The length is width of your bag x 2 + about 6 more inches for knotting.


Dsb2_6_safety_pin


8.  Put a safety pin through the cord.  If it is something that frays easily, wrap the end with a little tape before inserting the safety pin.  To make it easy to scooch, use the biggest safety pin that will fit through your casing easily.


Dsb2_7_thread_through


9.  Using the safety pin to hold on to, thread your drawstring into the casing, scooching it along inch by inch.  Go in one side, through to the other side, and come out where you started.


Dsb2_8_other_side 


10.  Do the same with the other piece of cord, but start on the opposite side this time.  When you are done, you’ll have the picture above.


Dsb2_9_tie_knot


11. Tie a simple knot to secure your drawstring by holding the two ends of one string even, forming a loop in the cord and pulling the end through.  You can make the knot quite close to the bag.  Repeat on the other side.
12.  Cut the ends of your cord off even, an inch from your knot — or closer/further depending on what you want.  If your cord might fray, dab it with a little craft glue (like Tacky Glue) or fray stopping liquid (such as Stop Fray) and let it dry.
13.  You are done!  Celebrate.


Note:  This bag has exposed, unfinished seams on the inside.  It is fine for casual but is probably unsuitable for hard use or washing. 

Be Sociable, Share!

Related Posts:


About The Author

Pattern Maker, Instructor & Author

Comments

Leave a Reply